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Calendula officinalis - Also known as marigold or pot marigold.

Calendula’s bright flowers range in color from yellow to a bright orange. It has widely spaced toothy leaves and grows to a height of about 18 inches. Be sure not to confuse this bushy, aromatic annual with African or French Marigold.

It is a readily self seeding annual. Plant in direct sun with well drained soil with moderate water. Pick flower heads daily to encourage more growth. Calendula will repel eelworm in the garden and is a good companion plant for beans, lettuce, potatoes, roses and tomatoes.

Calendula is a great soothing herb for the skin. I use it in a lot of my salves, oil and skin care recipes to sooth and calm skin redness, rash, and irritation. It is good to treat cuts, burns, lacerations, bruises, diaper rash, sprains and inflammation. It promotes rapid healing and helps minimize scarring.

Calendula is great in a poultice for sore nipples, ulcers, sprains and varicose veins.

It is also a very good lymphatic herb that helps thin and drain lymph that sometimes gets clogged and congested.  My husband had very thick lymph around his neck and ears that was causing ear issues and with massage, and Calendula tea, his lymph drainage improved and so did his ear problems. It also boosts immunity by increasing lymphatic drainage. Note that Calendula tea will make you pee a lot, and this is a good thing. Just be sure to drink plenty of water with it to help aid the body in the clearing of toxins from the body.

I hope you can see why this wonderful and beautiful herb is always at hand in my herbal “Medicine Cabinet“.

How do you use Calendula?

 

Shared on Wildcrafting Wednesday.

About Amanda

Amanda is a mother of two amazing toddlers. She is an herbalist, natural living guru, and real food, gluten free eating pro. She loves to help educate others on how to take control of their own health through natural living, real food, herbs, essential oils, and most of all - a positive mind set. Her other business Natural Herbal Living Magazine is all about helping people learn about how to use one herb a month on a deep and profound level.
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5 Responses to Calendula: An Herbal Primer

  1. [...] Chamomile, Calendula, Catnip, Dandelion root, Elder Berry, Fennel, Lavender, Licorice, Marshmallow root, Nettle, Oat straw, Peppermint, Red Clover, Red Raspberry Leaf, Rose Hips, St. John’s Wort, Valerian, Yarrow [...]

  2. [...] Chamomile, Calendula, Catnip, Dandelion root, Elder Berry, Fennel, Ginger Root, Lavender, Licorice, Marshmallow root, Nettle, Oat straw, Peppermint, Red Clover, Red Raspberry Leaf, Rose Hips, St. John’s Wort, Valerian, Yarrow [...]

  3. [...] You can learn all about Calendula in this Herbal Primer [...]

  4. [...] Calendula is one of my all time favorite restorative and healing herbs. I use it in most of my salves, lotions and lotion bars because it is just so soothing  nourishing and has great regenerative properties.  You can read all about calendula in this herbal primer. [...]

  5. [...] Calendula is one of my all time favorite restorative and healing herbs. I use it in most of my salves, lotions and lotion bars because it is just so soothing  nourishing and has great regenerative properties.  You can read all about calendula in this herbal primer. [...]

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